dressing_tudors

Lady Mary Talbot is preparing to attend a night of dancing and entertainment at a royal masque. See her transformation from informal undress to full court dress and witness the many layers of clothing and careful arranging required to achieve the extreme fashions favoured by late 16th century courtiers. A silkwoman from London, Dorothy Speckhard, helps (and hinders) Lady Mary’s preparations with all manner of fancy goods (very like the ones she supplies to the queen) from her shop. Their discussions of starch, spangles and supportasses give a glimpse of the labour behind the luxury of aristocratic dress.

If you would like to host a Tudor Tailor event, please contact Jane (visit “contact us” for details) to discuss prices and practicalities. We are based in the UK but happy to travel the world!
“Fantastic showmanship”

Lisa Little, Strangers Hall Museum, Norwich
30 June 2014
Get violent with your velvets

Get violent with your velvets under the expert eye of The Tudor Tailor using specially-designed, hand-made tools for the job. Ninya and Jane are working with Stephen Norris of Red Dog Forge (www.reddogforge.co.uk) to develop a brand new set of pinking tools, to be launched during their visit to Chicago’s Silver Linings Sewing Studio in October. The event features a hands-on workshop – Slash thy sleeves - with opportunities to try hot printing, ravelling and pinking using The Tudor Tailor’s newly-produced blades. The cast brass pinking tools are in production now (price to be confirmed) and will not be available to buy elsewhere until 1 December 2014. Participants who reserve places at the event in advance qualify for generous discounts on other products too but to whet everyone’s appetites, the team’s latest book The Tudor Child is on special offer at £18 for the month of July.

1 June 2014
Less is more – unless it’s lace

We are celebrating lace this month at The Tudor Tailor for two very good reasons. The first is that we have had a regular visitor to the shop over the past year who has made various purchases of lace and buttons. Little did we know that the customer was artist Sophie Ploeg and she was using the pieces in her latest works. The second cause for celebration is that we now have copies of a sumptuous new book of 17th century costume and textiles, including lace, from Glasgow Museums’ European costume collection for sale in the Tudor Tailor shop.

1 May 2014
Fit for purpose in Elizabethan England

Once upon a time there were three little girls – who went to Kentwell Hall in Suffolk – where the perilous business of recreating the sixteenth century is a daily challenge …

And they were each assigned very hazardous duties – explaining Tudor food, teaching court dances, and fletching arrows …

But I took them away from all that … and now they work for me, my name is The Tudor Tailor.